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Monday, September 6, 2021

Weather/Smoke ~ Picture of the Day ~ State of Maine Facts ~ Herb Roasted Bundt Pan Chicken ~ Labor Day

 



Good 52º no smoke, scattered clouds morning.
 
Yesterday the smoke finally left by late afternoon and we topped at 100º. 
 
 
Picture of the Day ..... oops!
 

 
Interesting about the state of Maine...


Maine is the only state in the United States whose name has one syllable.
 
The White Mountain National Forest covers nearly 800,000 acres, the forest covers a landscape ranging from hardwood forests to the largest alpine area east of the Rocky Mountains
 

Approximately 40 millions pounds (nearly 90 percent) of the nation’s lobster supply is caught off the coast of Maine.

 
Maine produces 99% of all the blueberries in the country making it the single largest producer of blueberries in the United States.
 

In 1641 America’s first chartered city was York.
 

Acadia National Park is the second most visited national park in the United States.
 

Togus was the first Veteran’s Hospital in the United States. The facility was founded in 1866.
 
90% of the country’s toothpick supply is produced in Maine.
 
Former President George Bush has a summer home in Kennebunkport.



The chickadee is the official state bird.



Maine lies farther northeast than any other state.
 
Maine lobsters have won international fame for their flavor and contribution to the culinary world.
 

 
Eastport is the only United States owned principality that has been under rule by a foreign government. It was held from 1814 to 1818 by British troops under King George following the conclusion of the War of 1812.
 

 
 
 

From Mr. Food
 


You don't need a fancy rotisserie to make the best roasted chicken - all you need is a Bundt pan! Our Herb Roasted Bundt Pan Chicken is so moist and flavorful, you'll wonder why you've never tried roasting your chicken like this before. (We just love how the chicken picks up the flavors from the herbs and wine in the pan!)

 

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 (4-pound) whole chicken
  • 1 onion, cut into quarters
  • 3 carrots, cut into 1-1/2-inch chunks
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup white wine

 

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350º. 
     
  2. In a small bowl, mix together olive oil, onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, salt, and pepper. Rub inside and outside of chicken with mixture.
     
  3. Slide tail end of chicken over hollow tube of a Bundt pan and place on baking sheet. Place onion, carrots, and thyme around chicken. Pour broth and wine into pan.
     


  1. Bake 75 to 90 minutes or until no longer pink and juices run clear. Remove chicken from Bundt pan and serve.
 
 
 
Historically this date....
1492 – Christopher Columbus sails from La Gomera in the Canary Islands, his final port of call before crossing the Atlantic for the first time.


1522 – The Victoria, the only surviving ship of Ferdinand Magellan's expedition, returns to Sanlúcar de Barrameda in Spain, becoming the first ship to circumnavigate the world.


1949 – A former sharpshooter in World War IIHoward Unruh kills 13 neighbors in Camden, New Jersey, with a souvenir Luger to become the first U.S. single-episode mass murderer.


1972 – Munich Massacre: 9 Israel athletes taken hostage at the Munich Olympic Gamesby the Palestinian "Black September" terrorist group died (as did a German policeman) at the hands of the kidnappers during a failed rescue attempt. 2 other Israeli athletes are slain in the initial attack the previous day.


1997 – Funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales takes place in London. Over a million people lined the streets and 2.5 billion watched around the world on television.

 

And births this date include....
1937 – Jo Anne Worley, American actress
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Pob-fCIsgkk/TmYuMCxj6iI/AAAAAAAALd8/8mFEx0_GOMc/s1600/jawMA28851161-0005.jpg


 
 
 


1944 – Swoosie Kurtz, American actress
..named after an aircraft by her father!
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-RVFHmGB6Q5k/UEi1OcIi9CI/AAAAAAAAcTI/7wGYhcSCll4/s1600/swoosie.jpghttps://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Vctda3nlYfA/UEi1QgfG6XI/AAAAAAAAcTY/HxePVDBGS_M/s1600/swossie2.jpg

1947 – Jane Curtin, American actress
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-P8MhroDyriM/TmYuQyGsEpI/AAAAAAAALeA/jlHR1XVmgqE/s1600/jcMA28851161-0006.jpg


 
 
 
 
 



1958 – Jeff Foxworthy, American comedian
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-XJNDMuqDZZA/TmYuV6DVEzI/AAAAAAAALeE/oZ-KlsPLMMA/s1600/jfMA28851161-0007.jpg


 
 
 
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Have a good Monday Labor Day. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

Labor Day on first Monday of every September recognizes the men and women who labor to build this country. Through a time-honored tradition with roots in the coordinated efforts of the labor movement of the 1800s, we salute the American workforce.

Since the founding of the United States, the country has relied on its workforce for its infrastructure. From its streets and buildings to its transportation and security, the nation runs on labor. The labor of what we create, build and harvest fuels our education and inspires our dreams. 

This National Day also signals the official end of summer. Those who work hard, need time to play, too. With the school year starting and summer winding down, the long weekend beckons. They use the extra day earned to spend with families and catch some R&R. Some will explore cities while others will seek outdoor adventure. No matter where it’s spent, it’s well earned. 

HOW TO OBSERVE 

Many families spend Labor Day weekend on vacation. They pack the campgrounds full or explore tourist towns for one last hurrah! As you celebrate this day, consider and appreciate your hard work and how it has added to the well-being and prosperity of our country. 

HISTORY OF LABOR DAY

On September 5, 1882, Labor Day first honored workers in New York City. The observance later moved to the first Monday in September in 1884. However, the observance wasn’t officially recognized by any government entity until 1885 when a municipal ordinance was passed. Interestingly, Oregon recognized the day in 1887 before New York state’s bill passed. As more states recognized the observance, its popularity grew. Then, in 1894, Congress declared the day to be a national observance.