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Monday, September 21, 2020

Weather ~ Picture of the Day ~ Princess Diana ~ Pizza Puffs ~ Bonnie Seibert ~ Barry Keith ~ National New York Day

 




 
Good 43º morning. 
 
 
Yesterday we started off with clean air and clear blue sky. We topped at 92º.
 

 
 
 
Picture of the Day...  Hotel Cass broken sign... LOL! 
 

 
 
 
 
Interesting....
On Aug. 31, 1997, Britain's Princess Diana died in a car crash in Paris at age 36. Her boyfriend, the Egyptian-born socialite Dodi Fayed, and the driver of the car, Henri Paul, died as well. Here are 5 things you didn't know about "The People’s Princess"..



 
Diana Was Not the First Choice for Prince CharlesCharles was heavy on the dating scene in the late 1970s, spending time with ladies such as Lady Jane Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington’s daughter, and brewery heiress Sabrina Guinness. He even proposed to the granddaughter of his mentor Lord Louis Mountbatten (she said no). He was also spending time with Sarah Spencer, Diana’s sister. Through it all, he had one very ineligible bachelorette on his mind: Camilla Shand, who had married Andrew Parker Bowles in 1973. Under pressure to tie the knot, Charles turned to the Queen—and to Camilla—for advice. Both agreed that Diana would be a good fit. Charles proposed on February 3, 1981 in the nursery at Windsor Castle.
 
Nearly 750 Million People Watched Di and Charles Get Married


When Kate Middleton married Prince William in 2011, nearly 300 million viewers tuned in. Sounds like a lot of people right? Hardly. In 1981, when Diana married the Prince of Wales, over 750 million people around the world tuned in to watch the wedding.  To put that into perspective, that’s six and a half times the number of people who watched the most-viewed Super Bowl.
 

She Was the First Royal to Omit "Obey" From Her VowsDiana was a trendsetter in more ways than one. Not only was she a breath of fresh air in what had seemed like a stodgy, traditional royal family, but she also changed royal wedding vows in a way that stuck. She omitted the part about obeying her husband, and while she likely wasn't the first woman to do that, she was the first royal. Both Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle omitted that part of the vows too.

 

Her Wedding Dress Had Nearly 10,000 PearlsPrincess Diana’s iconic wedding dress was one of the biggest secrets in the world until her wedding day on July 29, 1981. The gown featured 10,000 pearls embroidered onto the dress. Diana reportedly had to be sewn into the dress because she had lost a lot of weight before her big day. The finished dress went down in history as one of the most memorable wedding dresses ever.

 

Nearly Half the World Watched Her FuneralIn 1997, the world population had topped 5.8 billion people, and nearly half of them (2.5 billion) watched Diana's funeral. Her death had stunned and saddened the world and brought new attention to how paparazzi went after celebrities and the lengths both parties would go to either avoid being seen or to see and snap a photo. In fact, Diana's brother blamed the media for her death and compared their treatment of her to hunting her.

 
 
 
From Mr. Food


 

With just a few convenient items from our market refrigerated case, we have the shortcut to some warm and welcoming  Pizza Puffs. The kids are sure to do their homework with a smile when you serve these up!

 

 

  • 1 (12-ounce) package refrigerated biscuits (10 biscuits)
  • 1/2 cup pizza sauce, divided
  • 1/3 cup refrigerated cooked crumbled sausage
  • 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
  • Grated Parmesan cheese, for sprinkling
  • Cooking spray

 

 

  1. Preheat oven to 375º. Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray. 
     
  2. Separate biscuit dough into 10 pieces. Make an indentation in the center of each biscuit with your thumb. Spoon a teaspoon of sauce into each indentation. Top evenly with crumbled sausage and mozzarella cheese and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.
     
  3. Pull dough over filling and pinch together firmly so that filling is completely enclosed. Place seam side down on prepared baking sheet. Lightly spray tops with cooking spray and sprinkle with more Parmesan cheese.
     
  4. Bake 10 to 12 minutes, or until golden. Serve warm with remaining pizza sauce.
 
 
 
Birthdays today... special friend Bonnie Seibert is celebrating. HAPPY BIRTHDAY MISS BONNIE! xo
 
 
Also celebrating is Jerry's gun show buddy, Barry Keith. HAPPY BIRTHDAY BARRY!! xo  Barry with his Dawna....
 
 
 
 
Historically this date....
 1780 – American Revolutionary WarBenedict Arnold gives the British the plans to West Point.
 
1897 – The "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus" editorial is published in the New York Sun.
 
1942 – The B-29 Superfortress makes its maiden flight.
 
1961 – Maiden flight of the CH-47 Chinook transportation helicopter.
 
1964 – The North American XB-70 Valkyrie, the world's first Mach 3 bomber, makes its maiden flight from Palmdale, California.
 
 
 
And births this date include...
1903 – Preston Tucker, American automobile designer (d. 1956) The Tucker automobile was quiet a ride. Maybe someday our Tucker can get one! How cool would that be!
 
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OTMzJFVf1oc/TnoF7k25yTI/AAAAAAAALyQ/WPrSqRY_HAA/s1600/ptuckerMA28859706-0012.jpg
 http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-AANpTHjLUNw/TnoF9E10ruI/AAAAAAAALyU/1itO0UdsP3A/s1600/tuckerMA28859706-0013.jpg
 
 
1931 – Larry Hagman, American actor (d.2012)
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xN-Yj8rLFCg/UFyBbcAAsOI/AAAAAAAAdB4/QJ1t7bxvZKE/s1600/larryMA29072018-0012.jpghttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/-QjpPnoP2RSM/UFyBdFySeqI/AAAAAAAAdCA/4RwqrHJpbGM/s1600/larryeyebrowsMA29072018-0013.jpg
 
1935 – Henry Gibson, American actor (d. 2009)
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-hxSh-sJ-sL4/TnoGGffJznI/AAAAAAAALyY/WifPJh626gE/s1600/hgMA28859706-0014.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1945 – Jerry Bruckheimer, American film and television producer
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-P8GZITklJqE/TnoGMQbcsgI/AAAAAAAALyc/_FLHroYZaZM/s1600/jbMA28859706-0015.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1950 – Bill Murray, American comedian and actor
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4yNUT9s4uuU/TnoGaDOfddI/AAAAAAAALyk/4vvPzFmdawc/s1600/bmMA28859706-0017.jpg
 http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-5sHo7e4BlSw/TnoGbmWfVcI/AAAAAAAALyo/M25DVr7xT-g/s1600/bm2MA28859706-0018.jpg
 
 
1961 – Nancy Travis, American actress
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-e6oELDIitbQ/TnoGlaCaB2I/AAAAAAAALys/114FDtDAcEI/s1600/ntMA28859706-0019.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Happy Monday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo
 

 
People & Places

The Lenape people populated the land now known as New York. They’re also known as the Delaware Indians. Their settlements also spread across New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and parts of Delaware and Connecticut. However, the Dutch were the first Europeans to settle the area and named it New Netherland.

Settlements and trading posts developed up and down the Hudson River. Albany, the state capital, was once called Beverwijck and the center of the fur trade. In 1624, the Dutch established a settlement on Nutten Island named New Amsterdam. Two years later, they would move to Manhattan Island, and the colony flourished.

Over time, the settlement exchanged hands between the Dutch and British several times, each without bloodshed. The first exchange, in 1664, would name it New York.

Independence & Influence

After declaring independence, the colonies later created the Articles of Confederation. Soon they discovered a stronger governing document was needed.

While New York sent three delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787, only Alexander Hamilton remained to sign the final document. A Federalist, Hamilton held strong opinions that could potentially influence the framing of the young nation’s new governing document. For one, Hamilton supported a life term of service for the President.

From the timeless halls of Ellis Island to the epic beauty of Niagara Falls and breathtaking Adirondacks, New York is infused with grand vistas and endless historical paths to retrace. With New York City as the epitome of a melting pot long before the term was coined, the state is full of inspiration for artists, sparks intelligent debate and philosophical discussion.