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Thursday, September 13, 2018

Awesome Clouds ~ Throw Back Thursday Dulse Chips ~ Mike ~ Picture of the Day ~ Soupy Sales ~ Pumpkin White Chocolate Chip & Macadamia Nut Cookies ~ National Peanut Day


Good 43º dark cloudy morning.
 
Yesterday another beautiful sky day with lots of clouds!
 



 
It stayed so cool yesterday that by 1pm we were still not 70º yet!! Then it fluctuated between 70º and 69º. No AC, windows and doors open. 
 
By late afternoon the clouds went away and we warmed to 77º.
 
 
 
Throw Back Thursday
In 2008 I was on a cruise and a port was St. John. Thought this "Dulce" chip was very odd....


 
 
More about the Dulse Chips...
They even sell them at Amazon.com !
 
 
More about St. John...
 
 

Mike came over and mowed and trimmed a few bushes.
 

 
Picture of the Day.....
Low rider, high tide, full moon, crack kills............
 
 


 
Interesting about Soupy Sales...
 
It is more than fair to say that a scandal erupted when children's TV host Soupy Sales asked his young viewers to send him "little green pieces of paper."
 
In January 1965 on his morning children’s show, Soupy Sales suggested to his young viewers that they find the wallets of their sleeping fathers and take out “some of those funny green pieces of paper with all those nice pictures of George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Alexander Hamilton, and send them along to their old pal, Soupy, care of WNEW, New York."
 
Today, It may be hard to imagine that this prank could cause a scandal. Many people in the 21st century have grown up in the modern era of radio and television with its “shock jocks” and numerous programs involving hosts playing all sorts of bizarre (and sometimes outright cruel) pranks on unsuspecting participants. However, in 1965 an off-the-cuff joke on television by Soupy Sales touched off a huge scandal over what would today be seem as a simple harmless hoax (joke).
 
Complaints from outraged parents came fast and furious. The television station that hosted the show with Sales, WNEW-TV in New York, had to pull him off the air. But contrary to common belief, Sales was not fired over the stunt, nor was his show canceled. He resumed broadcasting two weeks later, and his program ran on WNEW for almost another two years. Because the show was aired live, no hard copy tape was made. A verbatim transcription of what Sales actually said never existed.

More about Soupy Sales:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Fall is a comin'..... how about some good fall cookies!
Pumpkin White Chocolate Chip and Macadamia Nut Cookies
Prep Time:15 minutes Cook Time:10 minutesTotal Time:25 minute


Pumpkin rolled oats cookies with white chocolate and macadamia nuts.
 
 

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup white chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup macadamia nuts, coarsely chopped
 
 
  1. Cream the butter and sugar in a bowl.
  2. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract.
  3. Mix the flour, baking soda and salt in another bowl.
  4. Mix the dry ingredients into the wet.
  5. Mix in the rolled oats, white chocolate and macadamia nuts.
  6. Place the dough onto a cookie sheet one table spoon at a time.
  7. Bake in a 350º preheated oven for 8-10 minutes.
 
 
 
 
Historically this date..
  1956 – IBM introduces the first computer disk storage unit, the RAMAC 305.

2001 – Civilian aircraft traffic resumes in the U.S. after the September 11, 2001 attacks.
2008 – Hurricane Ike makes landfall on the Texas Gulf Coast of the United States, causing heavy damage to Galveston IslandHouston and surrounding areas.

 
And births this date include....
1766 – Samuel Wilson, possible namesake of Uncle Sam (d. 1854)

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-LNv25qvhcko/Tm9tr8WNLDI/AAAAAAAALls/deBNA3bwJlY/s1600/samwMA28855106-0003.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 


1857 – Milton S. Hershey, American confectioner (d. 1945)
 
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-cCvaG1sx9bw/UFIADcaxYzI/AAAAAAAAcpo/AsKNrdiAt1w/s1600/miltonhersheyMA29067859-0012.jpg


1925 – Mel Tormé, American singer (d. 1999)

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vB0ky_bjBc8/Tm9txv_s62I/AAAAAAAALlw/_1VFLSU-DWU/s1600/mtMA28855106-0004.jpg
 https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Mb34qXnOCLA/Tm9tyyQFz0I/AAAAAAAALl0/xLG9enKjBdQ/s1600/mt2MA28855106-0005.jpg
 
 

1939 – Richard Kiel, American actor (d.2014)

https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-l61eSY-AXXA/Tm9t68k_idI/AAAAAAAALl4/2wsAJjcmLL4/s1600/K15%2520-%2520JawsMA28855106-0006.jpg
 https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ZwmcewgdLc8/Tm9t8hsgmTI/AAAAAAAALl8/V_R64uuFMXA/s1600/Richard%2520Kiel-PRN-031347MA28855106-0007.jpg


1944 – Jacqueline Bisset, British actress
Wow, 5 husbands... not married anymore!

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-4mOmBJPK3WM/Tm9uEGNIIzI/AAAAAAAALmA/2I4day9Ds9M/s1600/jacqueline_bissetMA28855106-0008.jpg
 https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-gwdLoomSBxk/Tm9uFhBMU1I/AAAAAAAALmE/a8QF1rQQB3g/s1600/jacqueline-bisset-20050727-57866MA28855106-0009.jpg


1951 – Jean Smart, American actress

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-HPmOOCj0wuM/Tm9uS9ZamwI/AAAAAAAALmI/YvFBeHmoYuM/s1600/jean-smartMA28855106-0010.jpg
 https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-61EIdZnq5_Y/Tm9uTys-y1I/AAAAAAAALmM/oYICeuSPQ7I/s1600/Jean%2520Smart-SGG-086164MA28855106-0011.jpg
 
1952 – Randy Jones, American musician (Village People)

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/--J-1sOKwxZk/Tm9ubbX0KyI/AAAAAAAALmQ/pUd7my2OQGE/s1600/0412village2_wideweb__470x330%2C0MA28855106-0013.jpg
 https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-_BUIV8DbDJY/Tm9udxkNJzI/AAAAAAAALmU/MRvWvkKVUp0/s1600/randy-jones_lMA28855106-0012.jpg


1956 – Anne Geddes, Australian photographer (one of my favs!)

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-X3dFAcvROBY/Tm9unwYPGlI/AAAAAAAALmY/ezlRfMsTDds/s1600/bunnyannegeddesMA28855106-0014.jpg
 https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Hi4aRrlV5X0/Tm9uoySII5I/AAAAAAAALmc/skLTkDvWPwQ/s1600/anne_detMA28855106-0015.jpg
 
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Happy TBT. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo
On September 13 National Peanut Day pays homage to mighty and tasty peanut.
Likely originating in South America around 3,500 years ago, this legume is not a nut. They grow underground like potatoes. Since they are an edible seed that forms in a pod, they belong to the family Leguminosae with peas and beans. When it comes to plants packing protein power, peanuts provide a whopping 8 grams per ounce, more than any other nut according to The Peanut Institute. And remember, it’s not a nut! Nuts grow on trees.
The peanut is also high in antioxidants. Not only are peanuts high in necessary nutrients such as vitamin E, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, B6, iron, selenium, zinc and many others, but when paired with other nutrient-rich foods, studies have shown this amazing legume helps us absorb nutrients better.
For the longest time, livestock gained the greatest benefit from all these nutrients. Until modern methods came along, planting and harvesting peanuts were a labor intensive and risky endeavors for farmers.Gradually their popularity grew. From Civil War soldiers who found a fondness for them to PT Barnum’s traveling circus. But what made it possible for peanuts to be grown in abundance was an advancement in farm technology. Just like the cotton gin revolutionized the cotton industry, planters and harvesters transformed not only the peanut farm but farming the world over.
Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack ~ lyric from Take Me Out to the Ballgame(1908) by Jack Norworth and Albert Von Tilzer.
With the rise in peanut production, there also brought an increase of curious investigation into its possible uses. When the boll weevil wreaked havoc on the South’s cotton crop, Dr. George Washington Carver, who had already been researching this amazing groundnut, suggested farmers diversify into peanuts. It was an economic boon to Southern farmers.  He published his research “How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it for Human Consumption” in 1916. His continued research resulted in more than delicious uses for this goober, groundnut or ground pea. From shaving cream to plastics and cosmetics and even coffee, Dr. Carver’s appetite for the peanut seemed to be unending.
Many of the peanut discoveries Dr. Carver made 100 years ago are still being used today.