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Friday, November 26, 2021

Weather ~ Thanksgiving ~ Picture of the Day ~ Kevlar Invention ~ Mini Apple Pies ~ Black Friday

 


 

Good 36º dark cloudy morning.
 
Yesterday Thanksgiving dinner was at Jean's, my daughter-in-laws mom. Thank you Jean for a great dinner!!! 
 
 
Picture of the Day ... momma duck and her babies
 

 
Interesting about Kevlar.......
 

Stephanie Louise Kwolek (July 31, 1923 – June 18, 2014) was an American chemist of Polish heritage, whose career at the DuPont company spanned over 40 years. She is best known for inventing the first of a family of synthetic fibres of exceptional strength and stiffness: poly-paraphenylene terephthalamide—better known as Kevlar. For her discovery, Kwolek was awarded the DuPont company's Lavoisier Medal for outstanding technical achievement. As of February 2015, she was the only female employee to have received that honor. In 1995 she became the fourth woman to be added to the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Kwolek won numerous awards for her work in polymer chemistry, including the National Medal of Technology, the IRI Achievement Award and the Perkin Medal.

Kwolek was not very involved in developing practical applications of Kevlar. Once senior DuPont managers were informed of the discovery, "they immediately assigned a whole group to work on different aspects," she said. Still, Kwolek continued chemistry investigations of Kevlar derivatives for DuPont. She also did not profit from DuPont's products, as she signed over the Kevlar patent to the company.

 

Kevlar is used as a material in more than 200 applications, including tennis rackets, skis, parachute lines, boats, airplanes, ropes, cables, and bullet-proof vests. 

 



 

It has been used for car tires, fire fighter boots, hockey sticks, cut-resistant gloves and armored cars. It has also been used for protective building materials like bomb-proof materials, hurricane safe rooms, and bridge reinforcements. During the week of Kwolek's death, the one millionth bullet-resistant vest made with Kevlar was sold. Kevlar is also used to build cellular telephones; Motorola's Droid RAZR has a Kevlar uni body.

 

In 1964, in anticipation of a gasoline shortage, her group began searching for a lightweight yet strong fiber to be used in tires.The polymers she had been working with at the time, poly-p-phenylene terephthalate and polybenzamide, formed liquid crystal while in solution that at the time had to be melt-spun at over 392 °F, which produced weaker and less stiff fibers.

This sort of cloudy solution was usually thrown away. However, Kwolek persuaded technician Charles Smullen, who ran the spinneret, to test her solution. She was amazed to find that the new fiber would not break when nylon typically would. Not only was it stronger than nylon, Kevlar was five times stronger than steel.

 
 
 
From Mr. Food



Capture the full flavor of Grandma's home with these delicious Mini Apple Pies! This quick and easy recipe will fill the house with the glorious scent of apples and cinnamon for that true home cookin' feeling.

 

  • 2 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, and cut into small cubes
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons chopped pecans
  • 1 (7.5-ounce) package refrigerated biscuits (10 biscuits)

 

  1. Preheat oven to 425º. In a medium bowl, combine apples, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and lemon juice.
  2. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt butter; add apple mixture and cook 5 minutes, or until apples are soft, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and stir in pecans.
  3. Place biscuits on a flat surface and press with fingertips to flatten. Equally divide the apple mixture into the center of each biscuit and fold dough over to form a half moon. Using a fork, crimp the edges to seal, then place on a baking sheet.
  4. Bake 8 to 10 minutes, or until golden brown.


 
Historically this date.....
1778 – In the Hawaiian Islands, Captain James Cook becomes the first European to visit Maui.

  
1789 – A national Thanksgiving Day is observed in the United States as recommended by President George Washington and approved by Congress.



1863 – President Abraham Lincoln proclaims November 26 as a national Thanksgiving Day, to be celebrated annually on the final Thursday of November (since 1941, on the fourth Thursday).


1944 – World War II: A German V-2 rocket hits a Woolworth's shop on New Cross High StreetUnited Kingdom, killing 168 shoppers.



1968 – Vietnam WarUnited States Air Force helicopter pilot James P. Fleming rescues an Army Special Forces unit pinned down by Viet Cong fire and is later awarded the Medal of Honor.



1998 – Tony Blair becomes the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom to address the Republic of Ireland's parliament.


 
And births this date include...
1853 – Bat Masterson, American Old West figure (d. 1921)
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-lpj51lzNIEE/TtEKMIVcEWI/AAAAAAAAOkc/exIxBYRu76I/s1600/batmasterson02MA28896047-0019.jpg

 
1895 – William Griffith "Bill" Wilson, American co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous (d. 1971)
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HcKTEF-C5KM/TtEKQh58SrI/AAAAAAAAOkk/dik8kFzgpkE/s1600/orange-BillW-BMA28896047-0020.jpg




1922 – Charles M. Schulz, American cartoonist (d. 2000)
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-fzWRM9YYpYI/TtEKXFVOM0I/AAAAAAAAOks/CW3iThZg758/s1600/schultzMA28896047-0021.jpg
 


1933 – Robert Goulet, American singer and actor (d. 2007)
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-e4d7ft5saEY/TtEKaguDRFI/AAAAAAAAOk0/y9hatRrqCms/s1600/robertMA28896047-0022.jpg





1938 – Rich Little, Canadian comedian and actor
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-kqK4k3baWfs/TtEKeyp86nI/AAAAAAAAOk8/CbYag8JKH_U/s1600/rich-little-thenMA28896047-0023.jpghttps://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vPtN7PVg-FU/TtEKgK4yDpI/AAAAAAAAOlE/uUoC1kxwRAQ/s1600/rich2MA28896047-0024.jpg
 




1939 – Tina Turner, American singer and actress
 
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Have a good Friday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

In the United States, the day after Thanksgiving has become known as Black Friday and is considered the official kick-off for holiday shopping. Retailers across the country slash prices, offer doorbuster deals on popular big-ticket items, and often open in the wee hours of the morning to extend early bird specials. Dedicated and thrifty shoppers line up outside the stores to be the first to grab that special deal or this season’s popular and hard-to-find gift.  

Despite being the traditional kick-off to holiday shopping, Black Friday isn’t the only day retailers slash prices. These days, many retailers begin deals and specials right after Halloween. Many also offer special, exclusive deals to their online or app-using shoppers.

HOW TO OBSERVE 

Get out for those amazing Black Friday deals.

There are several ways to maximize your Black Friday shopping success:

  • Plan ahead. Scour the ads both online and in newspapers.
  • Prioritize the wish list.  Which item will you save the most if you can nab it?
  • Check to see if any of the deals are available online. Why stand in line when you can order from the comfort of your home?
  • Compare lists with friends and family. We can’t be in two places at once, and not all the deals on your lists will be at the same store.
  • Coordinate with your group to divide and conquer.  Work as a team to maximize successful shopping.
  • Make sure there isn’t a purchase limit.  If there is, make sure the team for that store is big enough to obtain the required number of bounty.
  • Set the alarm clock.  Some of the best Black Friday deals start soon after midnight.
  • Dress warm if you are located in the colder regions of the country.
  • Pack a snack, a thermos of tea or coffee, and maybe even a lawn chair.  Those lines and the wait get long.
  • Work in pairs. You don’t want to lose your place in line if nature calls.

Black Friday shopping just isn’t your style?  That’s okay.   Then all you will need for that is an internet connection and a credit card.

BLACK FRIDAY HISTORY

The origin of Black Friday is derived from the enormous amount of sales retailers report which can often bring their profits into the black. Black in accounting is used to describe a business making a profit as opposed to being in the red denoting losses.

Before 1980, the term Black Friday had a more ominous term in sports. It was considered a curse. For example, in 1981, on March 13th (an unlucky Friday) the 76ers lost for the second Friday the 13th in a row. Sportswriters used the term Black Friday in reference to their bad luck.

In another reference, the term described the dread of employees who would potentially be without jobs on a Friday. It also reflected the darkest and widest spread financial impacts – the fall of Wall Street. The Black Friday of 1869 may be the earliest use of the term.

Thursday, November 25, 2021

Weather/Ice ~ Happy Thanksgiving ~ Picture of the Day ~ Thanksgiving History ~ Pumpkin Bisque Shooters ~ More Thanksgiving Information

 


 

Good everything is frozen again 27º scattered clouds morning. 
 
Yesterday we started at 30º and ice was everywhere.... the barn roof was white as well as all the pastures...  The temperature topped at 56º. 
 


 
 


 
 
Picture of the Day😁
 


 
Interesting about Thanksgiving....
 

 
Thanksgiving is a national holiday celebrated on various dates in the United States, Canada, Brazil, Grenada, Saint Lucia, and Liberia, and the sub-national entities LeidenNorfolk Island, and the inhabited territories of the United States. It began as a day of giving thanks and sacrifice for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. Similarly named festival holidays occur in Germany and Japan. Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States and Brazil, and around the same part of the year in other places. Although Thanksgiving has historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, it has long been celebrated as a secular holiday as well.

Prayers of thanks and special thanksgiving ceremonies are common among almost all religions after harvests and at other times. The Thanksgiving holiday's history in North America is rooted in English traditions dating from the Protestant Reformation. It also has aspects of a harvest festival, even though the harvest in New England occurs well before the late-November date on which the modern Thanksgiving holiday is celebrated.

 

In the English tradition, days of thanksgiving and special thanksgiving religious services became important during the English Reformation in the reign of Henry VIII and in reaction to the large number of religious holidays on the Catholic calendar. Before 1536 there were 95 Church holidays, plus 52 Sundays, when people were required to attend church and forego work and sometimes pay for expensive celebrations. The 1536 reforms reduced the number of Church holidays to 27, but some Puritans wished to completely eliminate all Church holidays, including Christmas and Easter. The holidays were to be replaced by specially called Days of Fasting or Days of Thanksgiving, in response to events that the Puritans viewed as acts of special providence. Unexpected disasters or threats of judgement from on high called for Days of Fasting. Special blessings, viewed as coming from God, called for Days of Thanksgiving. For example, Days of Fasting were called on account of drought in 1611, floods in 1613, and plagues in 1604 and 1622. Days of Thanksgiving were called following the victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588 and following the deliverance of Queen Anne in 1705. An unusual annual Day of Thanksgiving began in 1606 following the failure of the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 and developed into Guy Fawkes Day on November 5.

 

 

 
Jennie Augusta BrownscombeThe First Thanksgiving at Plymouth, 1914, Pilgrim Hall Museum, Plymouth, Massachusetts
 
 
From Mr. Food
 


Savor the flavors of fall in this recipe for creamy Pumpkin Bisque Shooters. Serve it in shot glasses for a clever holiday appetizer, or simply pour yourself a bowl and enjoy.

 
  • 1 cup pumpkin pie mix
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup sour cream plus extra for garnish
 
  1. In a soup pot, whisk the pumpkin pie mix and chicken broth over medium-high heat and cook 7 to 8 minutes, or until hot.
     
  2. Slowly stir in the milk and 1/2 cup sour cream and cook 3 to 5 more minutes, or until heated through.
     
  3. Serve in shot glasses or cordial glasses and garnish each with a dollop of sour cream.
 
 
 
Historically this date.....
1667 – A deadly earthquake rocks Shemakha in the Caucasus, killing 80,000 people.


1703 – The Great Storm of 1703, the greatest windstorm ever recorded in the southern part of Great Britain, reaches its peak intensity which it maintains through November 27. Winds gust up to 120 mph, and 9,000 people die.


1759 – An earthquake hits the Mediterranean destroying Beirut and Damascus and killing 30,000-40,000!


...............today should be known as the Day of Death!


1839 – A cyclone slams India with high winds and a 40 foot storm surge, destroying the port city of Coringa (which has never been completely rebuilt). The storm wave sweeps inland, taking with it 20,000 ships and thousands of people. An estimated 300,000 deaths result from the disaster.


1926 – The deadliest November tornado outbreak in U.S. history strikes on Thanksgiving day. 27 twisters of great strength are reported in the Midwest, including the strongest November tornado, an estimated F4, that devastates Heber Springs, Arkansas. There are 51 deaths in Arkansas alone, 76 deaths and over 400 injuries in all.


1963 – President John F. Kennedy is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.


1987 – Typhoon Nina pummels the Philippines with category 5 winds of 165 mph and a surge that destroys entire villages. At least 1,036 deaths are attributed to the storm.
 
 

And births this date include....
1846 – Carrie Nation, American temperance advocate (d. 1911)


https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-csoZ6LjNDoI/Ts-3eLUXnUI/AAAAAAAAOgs/QG7c_Em6Oc8/s1600/th_DrinkWineCheersHappyMA28895504-0029.gif
............here's to ya Carrie
 With a mug like yours, a man would have to be under the influence of adult beverages to even stand to be in the same room with you! Your face could sour beer!
Thank goodness you failed in your attempts...
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-vrQRYrW_uLA/Ts-3kZYh2LI/AAAAAAAAOg0/Wu_3IdLot_g/s1600/nationMA28895504-0030.jpg



 
1914 – Joe DiMaggio, American baseball player (d. 1999)
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-CKRpZWek0mU/Ts-3sA_fWaI/AAAAAAAAOg8/AHCm3_G_9g0/s1600/dimaggio-9MA28895504-0031.jpghttps://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xM_7UaOMqmE/Ts-3tXNaTNI/AAAAAAAAOhE/BY-F754hfIo/s1600/dimaggiomonroeMA28895504-0032.jpg




1926 – Jeffrey Hunter, American actor (d. 1969)
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-0UjiBSKB7MU/Ts-4N0OBaVI/AAAAAAAAOhM/0nm5PG21xMg/s1600/hunterMA28895504-0033.jpgTragic death!




1933 – Kathryn Grant, American actress
....had been married to 'der Bingle' (Bing Crosby d.1977)
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-3-HoHU8rZUM/Ts-4WCVidPI/AAAAAAAAOhU/GjCNBwjYny8/s1600/grantcrosbyMA28895504-0034.jpghttps://1.bp.blogspot.com/-WL2oIYddQbA/Ts-4X4n4gPI/AAAAAAAAOhc/HzNhEsjmX34/s1600/grantcrosby2MA28895504-0035.jpg
 


1940 – Reinhard Furrer, American physicist and astronaut (d. 1995)
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Z5xTr55UPFw/Ts-4dqdLSsI/AAAAAAAAOhk/gSzHnsk0Cg0/s1600/furrerMA28895504-0036.jpg




1947 – John Larroquette, American actor
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-VR04GPGJcS4/Ts-4jLWZnkI/AAAAAAAAOhs/xMi2L47FLBk/s1600/johnlarroquetteshowMA28895504-0037.jpghttps://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CGpumfvaPkc/Ts-4kUxeoZI/AAAAAAAAOh0/8mjUZwSXuQg/s1600/john-larroquette-2007MA28895504-0038.jpg




1960 – John F. Kennedy, Jr., American publisher; son of John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy (d. 1999)
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-wK2QigbkAZQ/Ts-4rX8pDlI/AAAAAAAAOh8/IC-FQo8eFa4/s1600/kennedyMA28895504-0039.jpg
 


1981 – Barbara Bush, daughter of George W. Bush and Laura Bush
1981 – Jenna Bush, daughter of George W. Bush and Laura Bush
 
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Have a Great Thanksgiving. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

In many American households, the Thanksgiving celebration has lost much of its original religious significance; instead, it now centers on cooking and sharing a bountiful meal with family and friends. Turkey, a Thanksgiving staple so ubiquitous it has become all but synonymous with the holiday, may or may not have been on offer when the Pilgrims hosted the inaugural feast in 1621. Today, however, nearly 90 percent of Americans eat the bird—whether roasted, baked or deep-fried—on Thanksgiving, according to the National Turkey Federation. Other traditional foods include stuffing, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie. Volunteering is a common Thanksgiving Day activity. Communities often hold food drives and host free dinners for the less fortunate.

Parades have also become an integral part of the holiday in cities and towns across the United States. Presented by Macy’s department store since 1924, New York City’s Thanksgiving Day parade is the largest and most famous, attracting some 2 to 3 million spectators along its 2.5-mile route and drawing an enormous television audience. It typically features marching bands, performers, elaborate floats conveying various celebrities and giant balloons shaped like cartoon characters.

Beginning in the mid-20th century and perhaps even earlier, the president of the United States has “pardoned” one or two Thanksgiving turkeys each year, sparing the birds from slaughter and sending them to a farm for retirement. Several U.S. governors also perform the annual turkey pardoning ritual, too

 

THANKSGIVING DAY HISTORY

Plymouth

In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England. The ship carried 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World. After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth.

Throughout that first brutal winter, most of the colonists remained on board the ship. They suffered from exposure, scurvy, and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived. When the remaining settlers moved ashore in March, they received an astonishing visit. An Abenaki Indian greeted them in English. Several days later, he returned with another Native American named Squanto.

Squanto was a member of the Pawtuxet tribe, had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London and returning to his homeland on an exploratory expedition. Squanto taught the Pilgrims, weakened by malnutrition and illness, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe. The alliance would endure for more than 50 years, and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans.

 

First Thanksgiving

In November 1621, after the first successful corn harvest, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast. He invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. Now remembered as American’s “first Thanksgiving”—although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term at the time—the festival lasted for three days. While no record exists of the historic banquet’s menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians suggest that many of the dishes likely used traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

 

The Next Thanksgivings

Pilgrims held their second Thanksgiving celebration in 1623 to mark the end of a long drought that had threatened the year’s harvest and prompted Governor Bradford to call for a religious fast. Days of fasting and thanksgiving on an annual or occasional basis became common practice in other New England settlements as well. During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress designated one or more days of thanksgiving a year. In 1789 George Washington issued the first Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States; in it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country’s war of independence and the successful ratification of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies.

In 1817, New York became the first of several states to adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday officially; each celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition.