Total Pageviews

Tuesday, April 16, 2024

Weather ~ Picture of the Day ~ State of Tennessee ~ Crisp Cucumber Salad ~ Jim and Dawn Forbus ~ National Eggs Benedict Day

  


Good 34º morning. 
 
 
Yesterday we started at 42º and ended up at 66º.
 
 
Picture of the Day...pet bird! 😁
 

 
Interesting about Tennessee ....
 



Tennessee (/ˌtɛnɪˈs/  TEN-iss-EElocally /ˈtɛnɪsi/ TEN-iss-ee), officially the State of Tennessee, is a landlocked state in the Southeastern region of the United States. It borders Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, GeorgiaAlabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is the 36th-largest by area and the 15th-most populous of the 50 states. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of EastMiddle, and West TennesseeNashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include MemphisKnoxvilleChattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.

 

Tennessee is rooted in the Watauga Association, a 1772 frontier pact generally regarded as the first constitutional government west of the Appalachian Mountains. Its name derives from Tanasi (ᏔᎾᏏ), a Cherokee town in the eastern part of the state that existed before the first European American settlement. Tennessee was initially part of North Carolina, and later the Southwest Territory, before its admission to the Union as the 16th state on June 1, 1796. It earned the nickname "The Volunteer State" early in its history due to a strong tradition of military service. A slave state until the American Civil War, Tennessee was politically divided, with its western and middle parts supporting the Confederacy and the eastern region harboring pro-Union sentiment. As a result, Tennessee was the last state to secede and the first readmitted to the Union after the war.

 

During the 20th century, Tennessee transitioned from a predominantly agrarian society to a more diversified economy. This was aided in part by massive federal investment in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the city of Oak Ridge, which was established during World War II to house the Manhattan Project's uranium enrichment facilities for the construction of the world's first atomic bombs. After the war, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory became a key center of scientific research. In 2016, the element tennessine was named for the state, largely in recognition of the roles played by Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Tennessee in its discovery. Tennessee has also played a major role in the development of many forms of popular music, including countrybluesrock and rollsoul, and gospel.

 

Tennessee has diverse terrain and land forms, and from east to west, contains a mix of cultural features characteristic of Appalachia, the Upland South, and the Deep South. The Blue Ridge Mountains along the eastern border reach some of the highest elevations in eastern North America, and the Cumberland Plateau contains many scenic valleys and waterfalls. The central part of the state is marked by cavernous bedrock and irregular rolling hills, and level, fertile plains define West Tennessee. The state is twice bisected by the Tennessee River, and the Mississippi River forms its western border. Its economy is dominated by the health caremusicfinanceautomotivechemicalelectronics, and tourism sectors, and cattlesoybeanscornpoultry, and cotton are its primary agricultural products. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the nation's most visited national park, is in eastern Tennessee.

 

^Nashville 


Etymology

Tennessee derives its name most directly from the Cherokee town of Tanasi (or "Tanase", in syllabary: ᏔᎾᏏ) in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee, on the Tanasi River, now known as the Little Tennessee River. This town appeared on British maps as early as 1725. In 1567, Spanish explorer Captain Juan Pardo and his party encountered a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in the area while traveling inland from modern-day South Carolina; however, it is unknown if this was the same settlement as Tanasi. Recent research suggests that the Cherokees adapted the name from the Yuchi word Tana-tsee-dgee, meaning "brother-waters-place" or "where-the-waters-meet". The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to Governor James Glen of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", and in 1796, a constitutional convention, organizing the new state out of the Southwest Territory, adopted "Tennessee" as the state's name.

 


 ^Memphis


As support for statehood grew among the settlers, Governor Blount called for elections, which were held in December 1793. The 13-member territorial House of Representatives first convened in Knoxville on February 24, 1794, to select ten members for the legislature's upper house, the council. The full legislature convened on August 25, 1794. In June 1795, the legislature conducted a census of the territory, which recorded a population of 77,263, including 10,613 slaves, and a poll that showed 6,504 in favor of statehood and 2,562 opposed. Elections for a constitutional convention were held in December 1795, and the delegates convened in Knoxville on January 17, 1796, to begin drafting a state constitution. During this convention, the name Tennessee was chosen for the new state. The constitution was completed on February 6, which authorized elections for the state's new legislature, the Tennessee General Assembly. The legislature convened on March 28, 1796, and the next day, John Sevier was announced as the state's first governor. Tennessee was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796, as the 16th state and the first created from federal territory.

 


 ^Chattanooga 


If you want to read a whole lot more, go here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennessee

 

 
From Mr. Food
 

SERVES
4
CHILL TIME
2 Hr

Enjoy the fresh tastes of a homemade cucumber salad with our recipe for Crisp Cucumber Salad. It's got a touch of sweetness that really complements the tangy vinegar and makes it extra-delicious. Plus, red bell peppers give it such a nice pop of color too! Your family will love the crunchy, crispy texture of the cucumbers so much that they'll be begging for this cucumber salad recipe all summer long.

 

  • 2 cucumbers, thinly sliced (see Tip)
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 small red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper

 

  1. In a medium bowl, combine cucumbers, scallions, and red pepper.
     
  2. In a small bowl, combine remaining ingredients; pour over cucumber mixture. Cover and chill at least 2 hours before tossing and serving.

 

***The cucumbers can be peeled or unpeeled, or you can "stripe" them by running a fork or vegetable peeler down them before slicing, to give them a fancy, ridged look.
 
 
Special 41st anniversary today, Jim and Dawn Forbus (Jim retired from Washoe Co. Sheriff's Dept and one of our "kids" from the days back at Temple Station and aka 'The Busses'!). HAPPY ANNIVERSARY KIDS!
♥
 
 
Historically this date......
1818 – The United States Senate ratifies the Rush-Bagot Treaty, establishing the border with Canada.


1945 – More than 7,000 die when the German refugee ship Goya is sunk by a Soviet submarine torpedo.
Good Lord! 7,000!!!!!


1962 – Walter Cronkite takes over as the lead news anchor of the CBS Evening News, during which time he would become "the most trusted man in America".


1990 – The "Doctor of Death", Jack Kevorkian, participates in his first assisted suicide.

 

And births this date include...
1889 – Charlie Chaplin, English actor and filmmaker (d. 1977)


https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEh1noC2vYwkQX1_AaANTnxw6syY2txOgJsx5cg-udziV0GEA-1nqpM8WvFU2zZEMAfQcCotyOp8xsYGKdfT5LmlftpyiMmr_0w6VfMW1NnQQHCbLzdGLe-N9aDaaAy3SYQLdZL6pipAWlA/s1600/charlie1MA28982422-0020.jpghttps://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEi-U0b3S89TgCSolh2St8ccQdmBHzINctSpLAydMsv44TiWMyfpnZ37FT2sWE-Jsb39mvLtEqawovuSCSEy7gOj-B7qdDglxOhsh6D1ylV-7dFmDJ-GTtioLQpL_TxHKZu1FPTnyd2XVFg/s1600/charlieMA28982422-0021.jpg
 



1924 – Henry Mancini, American composer (d. 1994)
https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEh08inArrah8xep1PFYPZ1ArKW8yCDyai57dlsYgO3Hwce0sQE9QJXr0-uksN9QrAEINn2np6GbW-CbRMGzktsCp3u59Psd5RU60CwEPhHGPhmy235HnDL_7MYkiiDn8SkuFohAipd863Q/s1600/henryMA28982422-0022.jpg


1927 – Edie Adams, American actress (d. 2008)
https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEiJfqGFofzV9RguK9liJ2z9AeIW_kzM8RM2QB-rczwj_zFBjdY6c-Hl4-FL6Pbp-sGxTCPeEBLdXithfWI3KV3WwanhLTGfrKrAFL6cWtOK6e82xGQw3PD_azDGdkMlzDsVG4waHZBj0uc/s1600/edieMA28982422-0023.jpghttps://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEh81i_4VjNV0ykRuAQvRxCki_or0bDZdrxXJzCsVOyLuy0dkUKqxLpwo9juudO4pZHHXbU2xGqbV8vB5TYZkWG9MLW9HZuynbh4Y1ocSFbmuyVUeptMqchfRT2HlkcuMt3bzEYV85ZhZA0/s1600/edie2MA28982422-0024.jpg



1935 – Bobby Vinton, American singer
https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEj03ZKg1BxIXUlkS73qa8e1j3aCLEqDgjBQl4OtRgJ2UQV0OZdkZSYm2pXFXhqDyA0wEP0evxuQNshcM07GdKsDTShh2iVkwuQVjosnDJR9tUWi1vK1hCa0jl1CVZVblvQCGvO8hTMRuLQ/s1600/bobbyMA28982422-0025.jpghttps://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEhAZNtn5lbmuyIA3tWLBXfpIY0-VYbtIo2c2i4RmH_kYZcPJZ9yTZOrG6qJZ8Scsk_LD_9Mpus99qcKZZaFR9Y9c8ch2w0bXHBm3-AgH5jTgXMiD1dVrldCHjxYz6ljz7UKJ_VNt5ilORU/s1600/BobbyVintonMA28982422-0026.jpg
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Have a good Tuesday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

On April 16th, National Eggs Benedict Day celebrates a long favored breakfast or brunch dish. Eggs Benedict consists of poached eggs with Hollandaise sauce and Canadian bacon or ham on English muffin halves.
There are two different stories as to how Eggs Benedict came to be.
  • In 1894 stockbroker Lemuel Benedict ordered “buttered toast, poached eggs, crisp bacon, and a side of Hollandaise”  at the Waldorf Hotel. They were so impressed with the dish that they put it on the menu substituting ham and English muffins in place of the bacon and toast.
  • In the early 18th century, Pope Benedict XIII liked an egg dish so much that he requested it time and time again. It is also believed that Pope Benedict XIII had an illness which added to his desire for this particular egg dish, hence the name Eggs Benedict.
Some restaurants serve their own versions of Eggs Benedict. Mix it up by substituting the ham for salmon or corned beef. Add sliced tomatoes or steamed asparagus. Replace the English muffin with thick, crusty toast or thin, crisp bagels. There are so many ways to be creative in the kitchen. The important elements with Eggs Benedict are properly poached eggs and a perfect hollandaise sauce. When the yolk and sauce blend with all the other ingredients, this meal is divine.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Treat yourself to a delicious breakfast of Eggs Benedict at home. Learn how to poach the perfect egg. Then whip up a delicious hollandaise sauce, too. It’s one of The Seven Mother Sauces used in cooking. Find out more about the types of sauces used and how to make them. Try making the recipe below.

Monday, April 15, 2024

Weather ~ Picture of the Day ~ Interesting About Kentucky ~ French Onion Bake ~ Aaron Maxwell ~ Jack Follen ~ 415 ~ National Tax Day

  


Good 42º morning. 
 
 
Yesterday the rain started in the night and was on and off all day. We went from 49º to 55º.
 
 
Picture of the Day....timing 😁
 

 
Interesting about Kentucky
 


Kentucky (US/kənˈtʌki/  kən-TUK-eeUK/kɛn-/ ken-), officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a landlocked state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Kentucky borders IllinoisIndiana, and Ohio to the north, West Virginia to the northeast, Virginia to the east, Tennessee to the south, and Missouri to the west. Its northern border is defined by the Ohio River. Its capital is Frankfort and its largest city is Louisville. As of 2020, the population was approximately 4.5 million.

 

Kentucky was admitted into the Union as the 15th state on June 1, 1792, splitting from Virginia in the process. It is known as the "Bluegrass State", a nickname based on Kentucky bluegrass, a species of green grass introduced by European settlers for the purpose of grazing in pastures, which has supported the thoroughbred horse industry in the center of the state.

 

Historically, Kentucky had excellent farming conditions, which led to the development of large tobacco plantations similar to those in Virginia and North Carolina in the central and western parts of the state that utilized enslaved labor during the Antebellum South and Civil War periods. Kentucky ranks fifth nationally in goat farming, eight in beef cattle production, and 14th in corn production. While Kentucky has been a long-standing major center for the tobacco industry, the state's economy has diversified in multiple non-agricultural sectors, including auto manufacturing, energy fuel production, and medical facilities. The state ranks 4th among US states in the number of automobiles and trucks assembled. Kentucky is one of several states considered a part of the Upland South.

 

The state is home to the world's longest cave system in Mammoth Cave National Park, the greatest length of navigable waterways and streams in the contiguous United States, and the two largest artificial lakes east of the Mississippi RiverCultural aspects of Kentucky include horse racingbourbonmoonshinecoalMy Old Kentucky Home State Parkautomobile manufacturingtobaccosouthern cuisinebarbecuebluegrass musiccollege basketballLouisville Slugger baseball bats, Kentucky Fried Chicken, and the Kentucky Colonel.

 

Etymology

In the late 18th century, prior to 1769, Botetourt and successor counties of the Colony of Virginia, whose geographical extent was south of the Ohio/Allegheny rivers beyond the Appalachian Mountains, became known to European Americans as Kentucky (or Kentucke) country. It was named for the Kentucky River, a tributary of the Ohio River in east central Kentucky.

 

The precise etymology of the name is uncertain. One theory sees the word based on an Iroquoian name meaning "(on) the meadow" or "(on) the prairie" (cf. Mohawk kenhtà:keSeneca gëdá'geh (phonemic /kɛ̃taʔkɛh/), "at the field"). Another theory suggests a derivation from the term Kenta Aki, which could have come from an Algonquian language, in particular from Shawnee. Folk etymology translates this as "Land of Our Fathers". The closest approximation in another Algonquian language, Ojibwe, translates as "Land of Our In-Laws", thus making a fairer English translation "The Land of Those Who Became Our Fathers". In any case, the word aki means "land" in most Algonquian languages.

 

Statehood

The county was subdivided into JeffersonLincoln and Fayette Counties in 1780, but continued to be administered as the District of Kentucky even as new counties were split off.

 

On several occasions the region's residents petitioned the General Assembly and the Confederation Congress for separation from Virginia and statehood. Ten constitutional conventions were held in Danville between 1784 and 1792. One petition, which had Virginia's assent, came before the Confederation Congress in early July 1788. Unfortunately, its consideration came up a day after word of New Hampshire's all-important ninth ratification of the proposed Constitution, thus establishing it as the new framework of governance for the United States. In light of this development, Congress thought that it would be "unadvisable" to admit Kentucky into the Union, as it could do so "under the Articles of Confederation" only, but not "under the Constitution", and so declined to take action.

 

On December 18, 1789, Virginia again gave its consent to Kentucky statehood. The United States Congress gave its approval on February 4, 1791. (This occurred two weeks before Congress approved Vermont's petition for statehood.) Kentucky officially became the fifteenth state in the Union on June 1, 1792. Isaac Shelby, a military veteran from Virginia, was elected its first Governor.

 

 

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace near Hodgenville

 

Kentucky produces 95% of the world's supply of bourbon whiskey, and the number of barrels of bourbon being aged in Kentucky (more than 5.7 million) exceeds the state's population. Bourbon has been a growing market – with production of Kentucky bourbon rising 170 percent between 1999 and 2015. In 2019 the state had more than fifty distilleries for bourbon production.

 

Horse industry

 

Horse Racing has long been associated with Kentucky. Churchill Downs, the home of the Derby, is a large venue with a capacity exceeding 165,000. The track hosts multiple events throughout the year and is a significant draw to the city of Louisville. Keeneland Race Course, in Lexington, hosts two major meets, the Spring and Fall running. Beyond hosting races Keeneland also hosts a significant horse auction drawing buyers from around the world. In 2019 $360 million was spent on the September Yearling sale. The Kentucky Horse Park in Georgetown hosts multiple events throughout the year, including international equestrian competitions and also offers horseback riding from April to October.

 

   Lexington^


  Louisville^

If you want to read a whole lot more, go here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky

 

 
 
From Mr. Food
 

SERVES
9
COOK TIME
25 Min

If you love the irresistibly delicious combination of rich oniony broth and an ooey-gooey cheesy topping, then you're going to love our potluck-sized recipe for French Onion Bake. It comes together with just three ingredients and is an everyone-favorite!

  • 1 loaf French bread, cut into 1/2-inch slices (about 18 slices)
  • 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded Swiss cheese
  • 1 envelope onion soup mix (from a 2.75-ounce box), prepared according to package directions for soup

 

  1. Preheat oven to 425º. Arrange bread slices on baking sheets and bake 5 minutes per side, or until dry and golden.
     
  2. Reduce oven temperature to 350º. Coat a 9- x 13-inch baking dish with cooking spray.
     
  3. Arrange half the bread slices in a single layer over bottom of baking dish. Sprinkle with 1 cup cheese and top with remaining bread slices. Pour prepared onion soup over bread and sprinkle with remaining cheese.
     
  4. Bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until bread has absorbed most of the soup and cheese is golden.
 
Two special birthdays today....
My step-son Aaron Maxwell is celebrating #55. HAPPY BIRTHDAY AARONOSKI!!! xoxo
 
                ^with his wife Marie
 
 
Also my grandson Jackson Follen is celebrating being 25. HAPPY BIRTHDAY JACK!!! xoxo
 
 
Having a birthday on this date is funny. 415 is a radio code from our LASD for "disturbance"!!! LOL.
 
 
 
Historically this date.........
1865 – Abraham Lincoln dies after being shot the previous evening by actor John Wilkes Booth.


1892 – The General Electric Company is formed.


1912 – The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survived.


1923 – Insulin becomes generally available for use by people with diabetes.


1955 – McDonald's restaurant dates its founding to the opening of a franchised restaurant by Ray Kroc, in Des Plaines, Illinois


1969 – The EC-121 shootdown incidentNorth Korea shoots down a United States Navy aircraft over the Sea of Japan, killing all 31 on board.
 


And births this date include....
1452 – Leonardo da Vinci, Italian Renaissance polymath (d. 1519)
https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEhT-Bv8L6b5W-hek8Btyj2VBVkFg7DDvPFCS-69dptAl9GLxNHVxVfadGxziFN01TvsbOmJ840bFOCNTBsLpCEG6HYpMvgdXsU7-t5RD_akdHKavT4dxN5QilOqOyY8VKnj7K7FcKp1N_Ks/s1600/leonardoMA29186214-0013.jpghttps://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEik0jHhB1nBEPrtxFZs9hnqVTy_IP6v0d17zsKwFx7Yhf8YSjuaF3z69o3R5Y24brwUeblnCjV5MK3-zx_1aPCyyyNrtOIFMUV23gVxFvxjoe5ZSzLoGTaG-gCJzkHoAwsLHXRBpqbAxBcc/s1600/leonardo2MA29186214-0014.jpg
 


1933 – Elizabeth Montgomery, American actress (d. 1995)
https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEidt9jW73HPzs184R_SZw2Qz-9a-tMOTotNtJW7NW8WxIh2PFJsQkcWhyphenhyphenb8Nn7GftTnb8axlNdx4oC5LiL9qQ7-t5Y8Pbf8Sk_Yba71Vedz7ne28raJqBo-vh2aYB-Iupk0mVpemYC7INpm/s1600/liz1MA29186214-0015.jpghttps://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEgJ1jKM-XfsD6SYpao1tgVnpDhEUKd191dx_CLwV7PvU8m1HBs7HmT4R1bW5fy2Apyec3gFKvRYKgqYitHg0JHUzmPFpx1fEArDtABeu7mlnQ8qn2BBgiJDK2dsR1v9odVsqn8-Q8pGyS7o/s1600/liz2MA29186214-0016.jpg
 


1938 – Claudia Cardinale, Tunisian-born Italian actress
https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEjneIHilUjYlRcDfDu8pVskVQhMaa7Y284rMBSQKsC6zgc2oNl-WWe5CMM-5M0Knhw0Hxn0UKJF5gbvM16uwhEogmVGSP6MHYyXzFkFCxL1TJLfiajaopqJB3qlwLCZmEjwpDoLHcl0Bo6V/s1600/claudia1MA29186214-0017.jpghttps://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEjS2Kmwk2ilJsQEBxeERYwCSGaBt9XswMxDABcc4lRHgm8mgFJrXHBqH5HYeWbJ8UM99cy9JexrBM0MjERESd6IhCLgDNbZycYVwMgwWscLpob0Bp08p2Qq0WFwe0cEkv40VdRwn43Q1ZfF/s1600/claudia2MA29186214-0018.jpg
 


1951 – Heloise, American columnist
https://blogger.googleusercontent.com/img/b/R29vZ2xl/AVvXsEhCsYZiL60DHLsiDzmKaE5zFsgEnjLU21G9F2M0KlhsT8s4LGeODbR6EgrjrtdwKWRiG1qsI0WAdMHzMPcnCkYgCjRB9z4qIDJhTmnSslYEYzqlRSrOPSw0bm81WXPbGVttjprxMD50RMXb/s1600/heloiseMA29186214-0019.jpg
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Have a good Monday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

April 15th of each year is National Tax Day. In the United States, the term “tax day” refers to the day on which individual income tax returns are due to the federal government. The day may also refer to April 15th for state tax returns.
The Federal income tax filing deadline is midnight on April 15th of every year, with extensions occurring when the 15th lands on a Saturday, Sunday, or a holiday. In those circumstances, the returns are due the first succeeding day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or a holiday.
These dates can differ depending on the residence as well.  Some years, due to extenuating circumstances such as natural disasters, more significant extensions have been granted by the Federal Government.

HOW TO OBSERVE

Complete and file your taxes. Whether you prepare your taxes yourself or have a professional prepare them for you, only a couple of things are certain in life – death, and taxes. Or so Benjamin Franklin once said.

NATIONAL TAX DAY HISTORY

Income tax was first collected in The United States in 1862 to fund the Civil War.  It was deemed unconstitutional due to not being apportioned with conformity across the states. The United States once again enacted income tax with the 16th Amendment in 1913. At that time, the filing deadline was March 1. In 1918 the deadline was changed to March 15, and then in 1955, for the most recent change, the filing deadline was moved to April 15th.  The day has come to be known as Tax Day.