Total Pageviews

Thursday, June 10, 2021

Weather ~ Picture of the Day ~ Bikini Invention ~ Chinese Spring Rolls ~ National Iced Tea Day

 


Good 45º dark cloudy morning. 
 
Yesterday rain was predicted and we did get some pouring rain and lightening and thunder. More rain is predicted from now through the weekend. 
 
 
Picture of the Day... owls are masters of hide and seek...
 

 

Interesting about the bikini invention...
 
Louis Réard (1897 – September 16 1984)) was a French automobile engineer and clothing designer.
In 1946 he unveiled a two-piece swimsuit at the Piscine Molitor, a popular swimming pool in Paris.
 

Piscine Molitor (French pronunciation: ​[pisin molitɔʁ]; is a swimming pool and hotel complex located in Porte Molitor16th arrondissement of Paris, Île-de-France, Paris, France. The complex was built in 1929 and inaugurated by Olympic swimmers Aileen Riggin, Matthew Gauntlett and Johnny Weissmuller. The pool is known for its Art Deco designs and the popular introduction of the bikini.

 


The pool was classified as a French monument historique on 27 March 1990, after having fallen into disuse and closing in 1989. The swimming pool complex was rebuilt from scratch in the style of the previous historic design. The new complex includes two pools and a four star hotel. It opened in May 2014.

 
Parisian showgirl Micheline Bernardini modeled the new fashion, which Réard dubbed the “bikini”. Made out of a scant 30 inches of fabric, Réard promoted his creation as “smaller than the world’s smallest bathing suit.” He named the swimsuit after the Bikini Atoll, where the first public test of a nuclear bomb had just taken place only four days earlier that week. Over the next 12 years, a total of 23 nuclear devices were detonated on Bikini Atoll by the United States government.
 
 
 
 
From Mr. Food


 

If you love ordering spring rolls from Chinese restaurants, then this is the recipe for you! Our spring rolls are easy to make and taste amazing. They're filled with a flavorful veggie mixture and fried until golden and crispy. They make a great appetizer or can be served right alongside some fried rice and your favorite takeout main dish!

 

  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 6 cups shredded Chinese cabbage
  • 2 cups fresh bean sprouts
  • 1 large carrot, shredded
  • 3 scallions (green onions), chopped
  • 12 spring roll or egg roll wrappers
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • Oil for frying

 

  1. In a small bowl, combine soy sauce, brown sugar, ginger, and garlic powder; mix well.
     
  2. In a large bowl, combine cabbage, bean sprouts, carrot, and scallions; mix well. Pour soy sauce mixture over cabbage mixture; toss to coat well and let stand 10 minutes. Place cabbage mixture in a colander and squeeze to drain well.
     
  3. Spoon about 1/4 cup cabbage mixture evenly onto center of each egg roll wrapper. Lightly brush edges of egg roll wrapper with beaten egg. Fold one corner of each egg roll wrapper up over cabbage mixture then fold both sides over, envelope fashion; roll up tightly.
     
  4. Heat about 1-1/2 inches oil in a deep medium saucepan over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add spring rolls in batches and fry 2 to 3 minutes per side, or until golden. Drain on a paper towel-lined platter. Serve immediately, but be sure to use caution -- the filling will be hot.

 

  • To serve these like they do in Chinese restaurants, don't forget the dipping sauce! A couple of our favorite dipping sauces are duck sauce and spicy mustard.
     
  • Did You Know?: In China, spring rolls are traditionally eaten during the Chinese New Year as a way to welcome in the spring. They're also said to represent wealth (because of their golden color). Spring rolls can vary in size, filling, and cooking method (some are fried, while others are steamed), from region to region. In the U.S., spring rolls and egg rolls are pretty similar, with the main difference being the filling. While both contain veggies, egg rolls typically include some kind of meat, chicken, or fish too. 

 

 
Historically this date.....
1925 – Inaugural service for the United Church of Canada, a union of PresbyterianMethodist, and Congregationalist churches, held in the Toronto Arena.
 .... I used to attend a Presbyterian church, Mom and Dad were married in a Methodist church, and Jerry and I at a Congregational church!


 
 
 
And births this date include...
1889 – Sessue Hayakawa, Japanese actor (d. 1973)
    Ah yes, he was in Bridge on the River Kwai.


http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-k4RElXyIaXE/UbXdKXZTXTI/AAAAAAAAq08/tFBZt_2N_XI/s1600/S-Hayakawa2MA29217474-0015.jpg

   
1921 – Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Greek-English husband of Elizabeth II  (d.2021)
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-bO1_WY2PMG8/UbXdN9LEOkI/AAAAAAAAq1E/j9qTBrpGzKU/s1600/philip2MA29217474-0016.jpg
 http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Wf4fGYJaMzA/UbXdNw7_StI/AAAAAAAAq1I/Gu6yBuRsJKg/s1600/philip3MA29217474-0017.jpg  
 

1922 – Judy Garland, American actress and singer (d. 1969)
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-VWSB_7xNCbU/UbXdUaeI8_I/AAAAAAAAq1U/PcjDH3D-MHU/s1600/judy1MA29217474-0018.jpg
 http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qjPpl2bPq3c/UbXdUWQYJMI/AAAAAAAAq1Y/XM-ktfABMOY/s1600/judy2MA29217474-0019.jpg 
 


1982 – Tara Lipinski, American figure skater
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-fJi5XFX18_o/UbXdb5ujVyI/AAAAAAAAq1s/m8XAEAvCyP4/s1600/taraMA29217474-0021.jpg
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Have a good Thursday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

 
 
National Iced Tea Day on June 10th each year celebrates one of summer’s favorite drinks. Whether you prefer sweetened or unsweetened, with or without lemon, many love and enjoy iced tea by the glass full all summer long.
Creating your custom iced tea is as easy as adding a hint of flavor. Whether you add a squeeze of lemon or the juice of raspberries, lime, passion fruit, strawberry, or cherry, make your iced tea your way.
An alternative to carbonated soft drinks and quite popular in the United States, iced tea makes up about 85% of all tea consumed.  Restaurants, convenience stores, vending machines, grocery stores and self-serve soda fountains make finding iced tea easy and convenient.
Recipes for iced tea have been found dating back to the 1870s. The Buckeye Cookbook, published in 1876, and Housekeeping in Old Virginia, published in 1877, both contain iced tea recipes.  It is believed, however, that iced tea started to appear in the United States in the 1860s and became widespread in the 1870s. During that time, hotels offered iced tea on their menus and railroad stations offered the beverage as well. In 1904, the beverage was introduced at the World’s Fair in St. Louise causing its popularity to explode. 

HOW TO OBSERVE

Brew and enjoy a glass of iced tea. With so many ways to brew iced tea, it’s become more convenient than ever, too. Create your favorite flavors by adding mint, lemon or fruit. Enjoy a drink during lunch at your favorite restaurant.