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Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Full Moon ~ F-15 Flyover ~ Deer ~ Neighbor Gerard ~ Wine Holder Picture of the Day ~ Mules ~ BLT Macaroni Salad ~ Crank Calls ~ Greg Walden ~ National Paper Clip Day


Good 48º clear sunny morning. Yesterday we topped at 90º! 
 
Full Moon out there. Be careful today~!!!!

 
Yesterday I had a few invites to go places, but decided to stay safely at home. The F-15 flyover scheduled for noon over Rogue River and Grants Pass came by here. They were quite high, but they came around here twice.
 

Their total time in the air around Rogue River and Grants Pass was 15 minutes.

 
 Dude was enjoying the sunshine....

 
There was this deer munching on the grapevines. Hard to get a picture without scaring her, taken through the dining room window...
 
 
 
My neighbor Gerard was up in his pasture cutting up one of his trees that had fallen during the storm Thursday....
 
 


Picture of the Day
Shared by pal, Carol Nasca (Wilsonite!)
 
 
 
 
 
Interesting....
 
A mule is the offspring of a male donkey (jackass) and a female horse (mare). Horses and donkeys are different species, with different numbers of chromosomes. The less-frequent cross between a female ass and a male horse (stallion) results in a hinny, which is smaller than a mule. Mules are reputed to be more patient, hardy and long-lived than horses, and are described as less obstinate and more intelligent than donkeys. Mules are used today in many parts of the world because of their ability to withstand hardships and perform work under conditions too severe for many other pack animals.
 
 
 
From Mr. Food.....
Okay, so you won't find any lettuce in this BLT Macaroni Salad, but we have put in extra-green and flavorful baby spinach. We think it gives this macaroni salad recipe a tasty new twist! Serve it to your gang and see how much they'll love it!

  • 1 pound elbow macaroni
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 8 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1/2 cups coarsely chopped baby spinach

 

  1. Cook macaroni according to package directions. Drain and let cool.
  2. In a large bowl, combine mayonnaise, garlic, salt, and pepper. Add pasta and remaining ingredients; mix well, cover, and refrigerate until ready to serve.

 

*You may need to add a little extra mayo before serving, if it's a bit drier than you like after refrigeration.
 
 
 
Historically this date....
1886 – The Pharmacist John Pemberton places his first advertisement for Coca-Cola, the ad appearing in The Atlanta Journal.

1942 – Bing Crosby, the Ken Darby Singers and the John Scott Trotter Orchestra recordIrving Berlin's "White Christmas", the best-selling Christmas single in history.

1953 – Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay become the first people to reach the summit of Mount Everest, on Tenzing Norgay's (adopted) 39th birthday.

1988 – The U.S. President Ronald Reagan begins his first visit to the Soviet Union when he arrives in Moscow for a superpower summit with the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.

2001 – The U.S. Supreme Court rules that the disabled golfer Casey Martin can use a cart to ride in tournaments.

2004 – The National World War II Memorial is dedicated in Washington, D.C.
 

 

And births this date include...
1903 – Bob Hope, English-American comedian and actor (d. 2003)
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Z9XdkSmPk_o/UaYlipwH2SI/AAAAAAAAqY4/sQpcLYa2al4/s1600/bobMA29210468-0013.jpg
 

1917 – John F. Kennedy, American politician, 35th President of the United States (d. 1963)
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-q2xbfX5J5Dg/UaYlnr339BI/AAAAAAAAqZA/UX682BoW6Ig/s1600/kennedyMA29210468-0014.jpg

1939 – Al Unser, American race car driver

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-J5q-hkgn99w/UaYlqY5h0yI/AAAAAAAAqZI/ysOi6AKeF0c/s1600/al-unser1MA29210468-0015.jpg

1955 – John Hinckley, Jr., American attempted assassin of Ronald Reagan
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-UKox9rWT-pU/UaYlusCBtZI/AAAAAAAAqZQ/pHKhxBe8KJ8/s1600/hinckleyMA29210468-0016.jpg


I had a call yesterday from a "toll free" number and the message left was "your computer has expired. you need to call 1-888 blah blah to renew your computer." Do people really believe this stuff????? Wonder what they would have told me how much I had to pay to renew! This crap never ends!!!


 
When I picked up my mail the other day, this letter was there from our US Congressman, Greg Walden. Such a great guy!!! Wow, thanking me for putting up a campaign sign! He has done so much for the State of Oregon and for Veterans! Thank you, Greg!!!!
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Happy Tuesday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

National Paperclip Day is observed each year on May 29.  Yes, even the paperclip has its own day of honor. It is about that well-known piece of curved wire that keeps our papers together and helps keep us organized.
While there are much earlier claims to the invention of the paperclip, according to the Early Office Museum, the first patent for a “bent wire paper clip” was presented to Samuel B. Fay in the United States in 1867.   The original intention of Fay’s clip was to attach tickets to fabric. However, U.S. patent 64,088 recognized that it could also be used to attach papers together.
There were as many as 50 others that received patents for similar designs prior to 1899. One other notable name receiving a patent for his paperclip design in the United States was Erlman J. Wright in 1877.  At that time, his clip was advertised for use in fastening newspapers.
The Gem paperclip, which was most likely in production in Britain in the early 1870s by The Gem Manufacturing Company, was never patented.  It is the most common type of wire paper clip and is still in use today.  It was introduced to the United States around 1892 and in 1904, Cushman & Denison registered a trademark for the “Gem” name in connection with paper clips.  Paperclips are still sometimes called “Gem clips.”
Today, paperclips come in various sizes, shapes and colors and can make your paperwork look more fun and lively.
Paperclips are not just for holding papers together. There are many other things that you can do with them!
  • Replace a zipper tab
  • Unclog a spray bottle
  • Unclog a single serve coffee maker
  • Hem holder
  • Emergency hooks for broken necklaces
The Paper Clip Project
During World War II this small, universal office supply provided a visual method of protest at a time when any outward signs of objection could be dangerous, even in familiar company.
Early in the war, Norwegians were particularly persistent in their development of symbols. The paper clip represented “sticking together” for a time until the Nazis caught on and banned the wearing of paper clips.
According to a March 5, 1941, Provo, Utah newspaper article (The Daily Herald), the Norwegians switched to new symbols as quickly as the bans could be issued.
In 1998, a group of middle school students led by language arts teacher Sandra Roberts and associate principal David Smith began a project through a Holocaust education class. The voluntary after-school class, Whitwell Middle School principal Linda Hooper’s idea, would be the foundation for developing tolerance and diversity.

Inspired by the story of the protesting Norwegians and their paper clips, the students began to collect six million paper clips – one paper clip representing one Jew who perished during the Holocaust. Adults today still wrestle with how the Holocaust could occur. Imagine middle school students trying understand the magnitude of such an event on humanity.
The Paper Clip Project gained international attention and by 2001 the students collected more than 30 million paper clips. The school dedicated a Children’s Holocaust Memorial which displays an authentic German railcar filled with a portion of the paper clips.
For more information on this inspiring story, the book and film that followed visit www.oneclipatatime.org