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Sunday, August 29, 2021

Weather/Smoke ~ Picture of the Day ~ About John Wayne ~ Hillbilly Pasta Bake ~ National Chop Suey Day

 

Good 51º cloudy smokey morning. 
 
Yesterday we started off smokey....       
 
And then it got worse....

We topped at 99º.


 
Picture of the Day....perfect timing..


 
 
Interesting about John Wayne....
 

Marion Robert Morrison (May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), known professionally as John Wayne and nicknamed Duke, was an American actor and filmmaker who became a popular icon through his starring roles in films made during Hollywood’s Golden Age, especially in Western and war movies. His career flourished from the silent era of the 1920s through the American New Wave, as he appeared in a total of 179 film and television productions. He was among the top box office draws for three decades, and he appeared with many other important Hollywood stars of his era. In 1999, the American Film Institute selected Wayne as one of the greatest male stars of classic American cinema.

 


Wayne was born in Winterset, Iowa, but grew up in Southern California. He lost a football scholarship to the University of Southern California as a result of a bodysurfing accident, and began working for the Fox Film Corporation. He appeared mostly in small parts, but his first leading role came in Raoul Walsh's Western The Big Trail (1930), an early widescreen film epic which was a box-office failure. He played leading roles in numerous B movies during the 1930s, most of them also Westerns, without becoming a major name. It was John Ford's Stagecoach (1939) that made Wayne a mainstream star, and he starred in 142 motion pictures altogether. According to one biographer, "John Wayne personified for millions the nation's frontier heritage."

 

Wayne's other roles in Westerns include a cattleman driving his herd on the Chisholm Trail in Red River (1948), a Civil War veteran whose niece is abducted by a tribe of Comanches in The Searchers (1956), a troubled rancher competing with a lawyer (James Stewart) for a woman's hand in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), and a cantankerous one-eyed marshal in True Grit (1969), for which he received the Academy Award for Best Actor. He is also remembered for his roles in The Quiet Man (1952), Rio Bravo (1959) with Dean Martin, and The Longest Day (1962). In his final screen performance, he starred as an aging gunfighter battling cancer in The Shootist (1976). He made his last public appearance at the Academy Awards ceremony on April 9, 1979[ before succumbing to stomach cancer two months later. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor of the United States.
 
Wayne was born Marion Robert Morrison on May 26, 1907, at 224 South Second Street in Winterset, Iowa. The local paper, Winterset Madisonian, reported on page 4 of the edition of May 30, 1907, that Wayne weighed 13 lbs. at birth. Wayne claimed his middle name was soon changed from Robert to Michael when his parents decided to name their next son Robert, but extensive research has found no such legal change. Wayne's legal name remained Marion Robert Morrison his entire life.

Wayne's father, Clyde Leonard Morrison (1884–1937), was the son of American Civil War veteran Marion Mitchell Morrison (1845–1915). Wayne's mother, the former Mary "Molly" Alberta Brown (1885–1970), was from Lancaster County, Nebraska. Wayne had ScottishEnglish and Irish ancestry. His great-great grandfather Robert Morrison (b. 1782) left County Antrim, Ireland with his mother arriving in New York in 1799 eventually settling in Adams County, Ohio. The Morrisons were originally from the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. He was raised Presbyterian.

 

Wayne's family moved to Palmdale, California, and then in 1916 to Glendale at 404 Isabel Street, where his father worked as a pharmacist. He attended Glendale Union High School where he performed well in both sports and academics. Wayne was part of his high school's football team and its debating team. He was also the President of the Latin Society and contributed to the school's newspaper sports column.

 

A local fireman at the station on his route to school in Glendale started calling him "Little Duke" because he never went anywhere without his huge Airedale Terrier, Duke. He preferred "Duke" to "Marion", and the nickname stuck. Wayne attended Wilson Middle School in Glendale. As a teen, he worked in an ice cream shop for a man who shod horses for Hollywood studios. He was also active as a member of the Order of DeMolay. He played football for the 1924 league champion Glendale High School team.


Although he enrolled in a cancer vaccine study in an attempt to ward off the disease, Wayne died of stomach cancer on June 11, 1979, at the UCLA Medical Center. He was buried in the Pacific View Memorial Park Cemetery in Corona del Mar, Newport Beach



According to his son Patrick and his grandson Matthew Muñoz, who was a priest in the California Diocese of Orange, Wayne converted to Roman Catholicism shortly before his death. He requested that his tombstone read "Feo, Fuerte y Formal", a Spanish epitaph Wayne described as meaning "ugly, strong, and dignified". His grave, which was unmarked for 20 years, has been marked since 1999 

 

Due to his status as the highest-profile Republican star in Hollywood, wealthy Texas Republican Party backers asked Wayne to run for national office in 1968, like his friend and fellow actor Senator George Murphy. He declined, joking that he did not believe the public would seriously consider an actor in the White House. Instead, he supported his friend Ronald Reagan's campaigns for Governor of California in 1966 and 1970. He was asked to be the running mate for Democratic Alabama Governor George Wallace in 1968, but he immediately rejected the offer and actively campaigned for Richard Nixon; Wayne addressed the 1968 Republican National Convention on its opening day.

Wayne was married three times and divorced twice. His three wives included one of Spanish American descent, Josephine Alicia Saenz, and two from Latin AmericaEsperanza Baur, and Pilar Pallete.



 He had four children with Josephine: Michael Wayne (November 23, 1934 – April 2, 2003), Mary Antonia "Toni" Wayne LaCava (February 25, 1936 – December 6, 2000), Patrick Wayne (born July 15, 1939), and Melinda Wayne Munoz (born December 3, 1940). He had three more children with Pilar: Aissa Wayne (born March 31, 1956), John Ethan Wayne (born February 22, 1962), and Marisa Wayne (born February 22, 1966).

He was a Freemason, a Master Mason in Marion McDaniel Lodge No. 56 F&AM, in Tucson, Arizona. He became a 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Mason and later joined the Al Malaikah Shrine Temple in Los Angeles. He became a member of the York Rite.

 

To read more, go here:

https://www.looper.com/452280/things-you-didnt-know-about-john-wayne/

 

When my Jerry was born his mom wanted to name him John Wayne Maxwell. His father said "no", so they named him Jerry Wayne Maxwell! 😁

 

 

 
From Mr. Food
 

Get ready for a good ol' country casserole that'll fill the hungriest of bellies. Our Hillbilly Pasta Bake is a cinch to make and won't break the bank!

 

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 green bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 (10-3/4-ounce) cans tomato soup
  • 1 (8-1/2-ounce) can cream-style corn
  • 1 (16-ounce) package processed cheese spread, cut into cubes
  • 1 (16-ounce) package elbow macaroni, cooked according to package directions

 

  1. Preheat oven to 350º. Coat a casserole dish with cooking spray.
  2. In a soup pot over medium-high heat, cook ground beef, onion, green pepper, salt, and pepper 6 to 8 minutes, or until beef is no longer pink. Stir in remaining ingredients including macaroni; mix well. Pour into prepared casserole dish and cover with foil.
  3. Bake 45 minutes, then uncover and continue baking 10 minutes, or until bubbly and hot in center.

 

 
 
Historically this date.....
 
1966 – The Beatles perform their last concert before paying fans at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

 
1970 – Chicano Moratorium against the Vietnam WarEast Los Angeles, California. Police riot kills three people, including journalist Ruben Salazar.


 
2005 – Hurricane Katrina devastates much of the U.S. Gulf Coast from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle, killing more than 1,836 and causing over $80 billion in damage


 
2007 – 2007 United States Air Force nuclear weapons incident: six US cruise missiles armed with nuclear warheads are flown without proper authorization from Minot Air Force Base to Barksdale Air Force Base.
 

 
And births this date include...
1916 – George Montgomery, American actor (d. 2000)
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-2-KB5MUL4g8/UD_gEIw6FeI/AAAAAAAAbto/A4g2S2l8Pwc/s1600/georgeMA29059535-0004.jpg
Jerry and I met him once at the Pomona Fair. He was into woodworking and made some beautiful furniture. Nice man. Big/tall.

 
1923 – Richard Attenborough, English film director (d. 8-14)

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-Bb662bFUuec/UD_gJZUtpiI/AAAAAAAAbtw/OLYehAmTYzI/s1600/richardMA29059535-0005.jpghttps://2.bp.blogspot.com/-eUg1PL9X5Zk/UD_gLCG2AYI/AAAAAAAAbt4/L6TdgEDlc9I/s1600/richard2MA29059535-0006.jpg
 
 

1938 – Elliott Gould, American actor
 

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-rENZdWR481E/UD_gbZ-bFjI/AAAAAAAAbuQ/GmLuFrRSKNg/s1600/elliottMA29059535-0009.jpghttps://4.bp.blogspot.com/-GjfSZcasb7c/UD_gc2ZF2yI/AAAAAAAAbuY/EBSJL265zhw/s1600/elliott2MA29059535-0010.jpg
 


1940 – James Brady, American White House Press Secretary and gun control activist (d.8-14)
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xYTM0tl1Acw/VACOK-txSfI/AAAAAAAA3Oo/eu4vDjx5jJg/s1600/bradyMA29472101-0007.jpg
 

1958 – Michael Jackson, American pop singer (d. 2009)

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-lt2VjYl1GBI/UD_goMVs6MI/AAAAAAAAbuo/ekaP-qsU7p8/s1600/michaelMA29059535-0013.jpg
 https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-eyEvEJUElHg/UD_gqwkhzHI/AAAAAAAAbuw/KiwbgvNqX9c/s1600/michael2MA29059535-0014.jpghttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-IAQcZHHJQkE/UD_guQRTQwI/AAAAAAAAbu4/8XJn2DyV9DQ/s1600/michael3MA29059535-0015.jpg
 
 
 
All I know. Nuff said. Have a good Sunday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo

 
Get your chopsticks ready!  National Chop Suey Day recognizes this American Chinese culinary cuisine each year on August 29.
Chop suey, which means assorted pieces, is a dish in American Chinese cuisine. The main ingredients include meat (chicken, fish, beef, prawns or pork) and eggs. As the meat cooks over high heat, add vegetables (usually bean sprouts, cabbage, and celery). The dish is bound in a starch-thickened sauce. Typically, rice accompanies the flavorful dish.
According to food historian Alan Davidson, chop suey is “A prime example of culinary mythology.” These food myths happen with popular foods. Illustrated below, several colorful and conflicting stories tell of chop suey’s possible origin.
Chop Suey Stories....
Some believe chop suey was invented in America by Chinese Americans. However, anthropologist E.N. Anderson finds another conclusion.  According to Anderson, the word tsap seui means miscellaneous leftovers and hails from Taishan, a district of Guangdong Province.  Many early Chinese immigrants traveled from their home in Taishan to the United States.
Another account claims Chinese American cooks who were working on the transcontinental railroad invented chop suey in the 19th century.
A prime example of culinary mythology. ~ Alan Davidson on the origin of chop suey.
One tale stemming from the Quing Dynasty connects to premier Li Hongzhang’s visit in 1896. According to the story, his chef wanted to create a meal suitable for both the Chinese and American palates. Another version of the story tells that Li wandered to a local Chinese restaurant after the hotel kitchen closed. Even though the chef was embarrassed because he had nothing prepared to offer, he made a dish for Li. Comprised of leftover scraps, the chef created the new “chop suey” dish.
Still another myth tells of an 1860s Chinese restaurant cook in San Francisco. After hours, the chef was forced to serve something to the drunken miners. He had nothing fresh to offer. However, to avoid a beating, he threw leftovers in a wok, providing a makeshift meal to the miners. The miners loved the dish, asking him for the name of the dish.  To which the chef replied, “Chopped Sui.”  
Traveling to the United States in 1903, Liang Oichao, a Guangdong native, wrote that there existed a food item called chop suey. While regularly served by Chinese restaurateurs, the local Chinese people did not eat this dish.