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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Weather ~ Miracle Noodle ~ Marie Curie ~ Mushroom Asparagus Quiche ~ Bruiser ~ Crab Cakes/Broccoli Slaw


Good 64º dark cloudy morning. Weather alert here from 10am to 10pm. Thunderstorms possible. Humidity up to 53%. Radar is south of us...


Got cloudy again yesterday and there was a "severe weather" warning posted. Thunder storms... maybe. Fire starters for sure if they happen. My Honeywell Weather Station shows a drop in pressure. 2pm it was 92º and breezy. Never got a drop.



Yesterday I was reading about this product that is called Miracle Noodle, a company started by a doctor. I ordered a 12 pack sampler... 

It contains
1 bag Angel Hair
1 bag Fettuccini
1 bag Capellini
1 bag Miracle Rice
1 bag Spinach Angel Hair
1 bag Garlic Herb Fettuccini
1 bag Ziti
1 Ready-to-Eat Spaghetti Marinara
1 Ready-to-Eat Pad Thai
1 Ready-to-Eat Vegan Spaghetti Bolognese
1 Ready-to-Eat Green Curry Noodle
1 pack Dry Kanten Pasta
It all sounds interesting and something to "play" with in the kitchen!


I found this interesting about Marie Curie.

Marie Curie became the first woman to win a Nobel Prize and the only woman to win the award in two different fields (physics and chemistry). Curie's efforts, with her husband, led to the discovery of radium. Her constant exposure to radiation led to her contracting leukemia and she died in 1934. Marie Curie’s century-old notebooks are still radioactive, so they’re kept in lead-lined boxes for protection against radiation exposure. Her body is also highly contaminated, so it was placed in a coffin lined with an inch of lead when she was buried.



OK, here's a yummy easy Mushroom Asparagus Quiche:

Serves 8
Prep and bake time: 45 minutes
Ingredients:
1 tube (8oz) refrigerated crescent rolls
2 t. prepared mustard
1½ pounds fresh asparagus, trimmed and cut  into  ½" pieces
1 medium onion, chopped
½ cup sliced fresh mushrooms
¼ cup butter, cubed
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
2 cups (8oz) shredded mozzarella cheese
¼ cup minced fresh parsley
½ t. salt
½ t. pepper
¼ t. garlic powder
¼ t. each dried basil, oregano, and rubbed sage
Directions:
1. Separate crescent dough into 8 triangles; place in ungreased 9" pie plate with points towards center. Press into the bottom and up the sides to form a crust, seal perforations. Spread with mustard. Set aside.
2. In large skillet, saute asparagus, onion, mushrooms in butter until asparagus is crisp-tender.
3. In large bowl combine remaining ingredients... stir in asparagus mixture, pour into crust.
4. Bake at 375º for 25-30 minutes, or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Let stand for 10 minutes before cutting.
5. Freeze option: Cover and freeze unbaked quiche. To use, remove from freezer 30 minutes before baking (do not thaw). Preheat oven to 375°. Place quiche on a baking sheet; cover edge loosely with foil. Bake as directed, increasing time as necessary for a knife inserted in center to come out clean. 


Historically this date.........
1866 – The United States Congress passes legislation authorizing the rank of General of the ArmyLieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant becomes the first to be promoted to this rank. 

 

1946 – At Club 500 in Atlantic City, New JerseyDean Martin and Jerry Lewis stage their first show as a comedy team.

1956 – Forty-five miles south of Nantucket Island, the Italian ocean liner SS Andrea Doria collides with the MS Stockholm in heavyfog and sinks the next day, killing 51.

1978 – Louise Brown, the world's first "test tube baby" is born.

2010 – WikiLeaks publishes classified documents about the War in Afghanistan, one of the largest leaks in U.S. military history.


And births this date include.....
1894 – Walter Brennan, American actor and singer (d. 1974)
https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-OZ28w3e7oxw/U9Jtc8e3nAI/AAAAAAAA2Rc/b5-eL_vaVVg/s1600/walter-brennan1MA29454136-0008.jpg
 https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-o9zChR3x5Zk/U9Jtc0OsnWI/AAAAAAAA2Rg/-mHrUjQe1LI/s1600/walter-brennanMA29454136-0009.jpg


1915 – Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr., American lieutenant and pilot (d. 1944)

https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-PUVQQt6AgTA/U9JtjI0uPII/AAAAAAAA2Rs/w4MZXjqSggs/s1600/joe1MA29454136-0010.jpg

1923 – Estelle Getty, American actress (d. 2008)
https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-F7jt373LMiQ/U9JtmpgnAlI/AAAAAAAA2R4/U-ONS4RMkaU/s1600/estelle1MA29454136-0011.jpg
 https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-bflY9Nh2tO4/U9Jtmp9lFmI/AAAAAAAA2R0/Pm3jm-Yq_Ek/s1600/estelle-getty2MA29454136-0012.jpg

1967 – Matt LeBlanc, American actor and producer
https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-9WH5PaGeP3I/U9JttAOjtVI/AAAAAAAA2SE/EeGfGsnQ5Io/s1600/matt1MA29454136-0013.jpg
 https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-o3KjXTW5zoY/U9JttODggXI/AAAAAAAA2SI/dEO4YAp_GGI/s1600/matt2MA29454136-0014.jpg



Still hard to work at my desk...


For dinner I sauteéd some broccoli slaw and mushrooms with olive oil, garlic salt, and garlic pepper. And I sauteéd two Omaha Steaks Crab Cakes...


While I was cooking, Bruiser was laying in the cool grass... It was still 95º by then.....



All I know. Nuff said. Happy Tuesday. Ciao.
xo Sue Mom Bobo
July 25th




Five Food Finds about Fudge:

  1. Fudge is a type of Western confectionery which is usually very sweet, and extremely rich. It is made by mixing sugar, butter, and milk and heating it to the soft-ball stage at 240 °F (116 °C), and then beating the mixture while it cools so that it acquires a smooth, creamy consistency.
  2. The components of fudge are very similar to the traditional recipe for tablet, which is noted in The Household Book of Lady Grisell Baillie (1692-1733).
  3.  The term “fudge” is often used in the United Kingdom for a softer variant of the tablet recipe.
  4. American-style fudge (containing chocolate) is found in a letter written by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge, a student at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York.
  5. Word of this popular confectionery spread to other women’s colleges. For example, Wellesley and Smith have their own versions of a fudge recipe dating from the late 19th or early 20th century.

2 comments:

Lydia said...

Hot fudge Sundae? That we can do!

The quiche looks like a winner.

My hat is off to Madame Curie. And to her very supportive husband. In those days, the man too often took credit for his wife's work without a second thought. Some things have changed. For the better.



Oregon Sue said...

Yes, brilliant women didn't always get the credit due. Glad they kept fighting for it. I like the crescent rolls in the quiche for crust. Easy!! ox